Buchanan Street Redevelopment Opportunity

1410 Buchanan Street, Nashville, TN 37208

Beau Beach, MBA CCIM presents:

For the first time in 47 years, the 12,743 SF commercial building at 1410 Buchanan Street is available for purchase. Long-time property owner and Buchanan Street business, L&P Silkscreen Printing, is closing for retirement.

The building sits on a 15,681 SF lot which provides adequate parking and 136’ of Buchanan Street frontage. Don’t miss this opportunity or you may have to wait another 47 years!

In North Nashville you get the same potential upside and expected gentrification as Germantown…without the Germantown prices!

This is a simple redevelopment opportunity that will accommodate many different uses. Ceiling heights range from 11’ to 16’.  A rear corner section of the building is two stories with interior staircase.  A single row of support beams is located in the center of the building providing maximum layout flexibility.

Zoned CS.  Commercial Service (“CS”) is intended for retail, consumer service, financial, restaurant, office, new auto sales, self-storage, light manufacturing and small warehouse uses.

Originally built in 1946 to be a hardware store, the base level is 10,343 SF with a 2,400 SF second level.  Masonry construction.  The two parcels included in the sale are known as 1406 and 1410 Buchanan.  Approx. 16 parking spaces. Traffic counts exceed 10,000 vehicles per day. Located in an Opportunity Zone.

Watch videos of the interior:  Video 1, Video 2, Video 3

Click here to get the Property Information Package.

To ensure a timely sale, we’ve priced the property below the six most recent comparable sales!

 

About North Nashville:

A walk down Buchanan Street, which cuts through the center of North Nashville, brings you past hot new pizza joint Slim & Husky’s, street bikers, luxury leather goods stores, a skateboard shop, a Southern-style vegan restaurant, and a buzzy art gallery.

North Nashville represents both the city’s cultural past…and a growing presence of new gallery owners, muralists, and other artists that demands attention. While its crisp new business-fronts are easily recognizable, the less obvious information is the thriving art and music scene.

To get a sense of any place, it’s best to start at the beginning. So kickoff your North Nashville exploration at Fisk University, home to a number of art galleries. The college is located just south of Jefferson Street, which started as a footpath between Hadley Plantation and the Cumberland River in the early 1800s, and by the early 20th century had become the intellectual, economic, and social center of the city’s black community. The proximity of Fisk University and Tennessee State University ensured a steady presence of influential scholars such as W.E.B. Du Bois, Ida B. Wells, and Nikki Giovanni.

Fisk’s Carl Van Vechten Gallery is most famous for its Alfred Stieglitz Collection, which boasts paintings from world-renowned artists such as Pablo Picasso, Paul Cézanne, and Georgia O’Keeffe.

Refuel at Jefferson Street eateries Helen’s Hot Chicken, Mary’s Old Fashioned Pit BBQ or Garden Brunch Café before you head west to see one of the area’s most arresting art works: a two-story mural of rock idol Jimi Hendrix’s legendary guitar showdown with his early mentor, Johnny Jones. Painted in 2016, the mural is a nod to the rich musical history of the area. In the 1960s, artists like B.B. King, Little Richard, and a pre-bandana Hendrix played the clubs on Jefferson Street.

North Nashville’s music scene, and its reputation as a thriving artistic center, became but a memory when the construction of Interstate 40 cut through the heart of the neighborhood in the late 1960s. It disrupted everything in the community. It destroyed most of the businesses on Jefferson Street. It made all the streets dead ends. So many of the people that patronized the businesses there and so many families had to leave the area.

But the neighborhood’s recent development boom has contributed to a resurgence of art…both as a result of new galleries forming and, through public art, a declaration of North Nashville’s already-established identity.

In the last eight years, it’s started moving at warp speed. In 2015, First Tennessee Park, home of the Triple-A Nashville Sounds, opened on the neighborhood’s eastern edge.

Germantown, just north of there, has become one of Nashville’s hottest dining destinations thanks to chefs like James Beard Award winner Tandy Wilson, who infuses the Italian menu of City House with Southern staples like grits and smoked brisket, and Philip Krajeck of seasonal small-plates eatery Rolf & Daughters. New apartment buildings have also been built on Jefferson Street.

As business and residents have come back, so has the neighborhood’s creative cache. You’ll spot signs of the prolific Norf Art Collective throughout the area; from murals to bus wraps, its artists are responsible for a growing body of work here and, increasingly, citywide.

The monthly Jefferson Street Art Crawl is another sign of the area’s creative rebirth. Though visitors can catch Nashville’s citywide art crawl on the first Saturday of the month, Jefferson Street has its own every fourth Saturday. Stops include the in-house gallery at One Drop Ink tattoo parlor, Harris’ Woodcuts, Thaxton Waters’ Art History Class, Garden Brunch Café, and Cultural Visions Art.

As you travel north from Jefferson Street toward Buchanan Street, there’s no shortage of imaginative food options, either. Stop by Caribbean Splash, a combo car wash/cafe for some jerk chicken; Ed’s Fish House for the famous fried fish sandwich; The Southern V for fried seitan and waffles; or new hotspot Slim & Husky’s Pizza Beeria.

The creative output in North Nashville isn’t limited to visual art, either. End your tour at the Buchanan Arts District, situated loosely at the east end of Buchanan Street near Ninth Avenue North, which is home to a number of shops peddling high-quality, handcrafted goods. At Emil Erwin, you’ll find luxury leather handbags, belts, and home goods; or pop next to Nisolo for sustainable leather shoes and accessories for men and women. Consider the Wldflwrs makes delicate engagement rings, wedding bands, and other fine jewelry; while Salemtown Board Co. designs vintage-style skateboards. The board shop moved from its eponymous Salemtown location to North Nashville and transitioned to nonprofit status in 2016 in order to employ more workers from the neighborhood…just one more reason shopping, eating, and exploring the artistic works here is intrinsically linked to this city’s past and future.

 

  • Price: $1,599,000 
  • Area: 15,681 SF Lot 
  • Phone Number: 615-200-9330 
  • Space (s.f.): 12,743 SF 
Posted By: on